Carine Roitfield and VOGUE Paris

Carine Roitfield, chief editor of Vogue Paris announced on december 17th that she is going leave her position at the end of January 2011 for personal projects. What exactly happened behind the scenes in unknown. However Carine mentioned already a year ago that she was thinking about doing something else. “I was not made for this position end even though I like my job a lot I will not die in this position” she said in an interview. One of the key problems was supposedly that Carine was not allowed to take other stylist projects than Vogue Shootings, which was probably fine when she started working at french Vogue and tried to bring more visual strenght to the magazine but limited her in the following years. As a very creative and hyperactive personality (without taking sleeping pills she is not able to calm down and sleep) she might have also felt that after working a decade in this position it was time for something new.

                    

Carine is the daughter of an urkainian filmmaker and a very chic french woman. She grew up in the 16th arrondissement in Paris, leading a very “bourgeois” life and started working as a model when she was 18 years old. “I was not a topmodel, just a model. It gave me a foot in the business” she says about the beginning of her career. Soon she began writing and working as a stylist for the french ELLE. Her skills as stylist soon made her team up with Tom Ford and Mario Testino and her reputation as stylist grew. As Tom Fords muse Carines career developed fast with his success at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent. She was working for Missoni before Condé Nast offered the position as the editor in chife for the french vogue to her.

Unlike other fashion editor she never studied Fashion. She doesn’t know every designer from the beginning of the 19th century all she has is afeeling for what is “exciting” as she describes herself. An attitude that shows on every page in french Vogue. The french Vogue is not about showing fashion in an accesible wearable way, you won’t find any advise on how to dress if you are shaped like a pear or about to turn 50. French Vogue Covers never show any Blockbuster movie stars, they are primarily devoted to models. That’s the whole point about this magazine it takes Fashion to its artiest and least commercial point.This attitude makes the surprisingly small magazine (just 130 000 copies circulation as compared to 1, 3 million for the american Vogue) so unique. Rumors that Carine would replace Anna Wintour were always disclaimed by her. “It’s like the question when you are an actor if you go to Hollywood or if you stay here in Paris” she said “I think I would prefer to stay in Paris”. Carine is not a business girl. She even thinks that the fashion world is getting a little boring because of all the money “I feel a bit when you go to shows they want to sell so many handbags, and for me, well, I do not like handbags. I do not wear handbags. It is not a nice look, to carry a handbag.” For Carine it is always all about the look.

She is always wearing straight hair, that is somewhat in her face, khol eyes, no lipstick, extremly high stilletto heels.

Carine styles a lot of the fashion shootings herself. She doesn’t start with the clothes. She usually starts with the model and comes up with a story. “I do a movie in my mind,” she says. “Who is this girl?”. She only hires the best photographers and everyone working at the french Vogue has to be “skinny and beautiful”. (She even has a scale in her office but denies weighing employees.).

Daran wird sich wohl unter dem neuen editor-in-chief auch nichts ändern aber ob er oder sie sich mit Carines Fotoshootings messen kann?

Documentary about her on youtube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ET3QW7pz32w

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